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Accessed 15 september 2020.

by | Sep 22, 2022 | English

 

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There is little doubt that new media and digital technology have profoundly changed the way we obtain and share information. A few cultural commentators have even gone so far as to dub our times as “the digital age,” claiming that the young generations of the world will think, act, and behave differently from their predecessors because of the influence of smartphones, social media, and digital technology. Part of this shift includes the proliferation of inaccurate or deliberately misleading information.
Misinformation campaigns aim to stoke the existing biases of population groups in order to achieve a very specific purpose: to cultivate a vehement distrust of others with views that are different from their own. In recent years, we’ve experienced a significant shift in our ability to trust certain forms of media and even public leaders to ensure that the information they share with us is correct. More than simply “fake news,” misinformation has long been the weapon of choice for propaganda, authoritarianism, and chaos.
But what are the effects of misinformation on society? Even if we fact-check what we hear, see, and read, do we still feel the effects? How much influence does misinformation actually have? How do we measure it?
Writing Project 1 asks you to read a minimum of four (4) informed opinions on these and related questions, and then write an analytical essay that explores the ongoing discussion about misinformation and presents your place in the conversation. To do this, you will need to explain the current state of discussion by drawing on Uberti, Kiely & Robertson, Shafer, and George & West, or others to frame the issues. You may include as many additional perspectives on the issue as you would like, as long as they add meaningfully to your own work in some way.
Your task here is to keep the dialogue going by locating your own thinking in relation to the other writers – extending their ideas and distinguishing your views from theirs.
Learning Objectives
In this project, you will learn to:
reflect upon your experiences with media and information culture and articulate specific thoughts, ideas, and knowledge to your audience
select, arrange and develop details from your personal experience and the perceptions of others to generate insights
think critically about misinformation and how it is shaping our world
think critically about the affected facets of culture in various situations
Audience
The primary audience for this project is your instructor and peers, who may want to learn more about your assessment of and position on the subject.
Requirements
1,200 word minimum
MLA format (i.e., paper is double-spaced throughout with one-inch margins; 12-point Times New Roman font preferred)
I NEED A ROUGH publish BEFORE I TURN IN THE ESSAY PLEASE.
Articals and citations:
George, Robert P. and Cornel West. “Sign the Statement: Truth-Seeking, Democracy, and Freedom of Thought and Expression.” James Madison Program, Princeton University. 14 March 2017. Web. https://jmp.princeton.edu/statement (Links to an external site.). Accessed 15 September 2020.
Kiely, Eugene and Lori Robertson. “How to Spot Fake News.” FactCheck.org. 18 November 2016. Web. https://www.factcheck.org/2016/11/how-to-spot-fake-news/ (Links to an external site.). Accessed 15 September 2020.
Shafer, Jack. “The Cure for Fake News is Worse than the Disease.” Politico Magazine. 22 November 2016. Web. https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2016/11/the-cure-for-fake-news-is-worse-than-the-disease-214477 (Links to an external site.). Accessed 15 September 2020.
Uberti, David. “The Real History of Fake News.” Columbia Journalism Review. 15 December 2016. Web. https://www.cjr.org/special_report/fake_news_history.php (Links to an external site.). Accessed 15 September 2020.

 

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