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This literature review is about In surgical patients, is there evidence to sugg

by | Apr 28, 2022 | Healthcare

 

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This literature review is about In surgical patients, is there evidence to suggest that surgical site infections (SSI) in the operating room compared to evidence-based preventions impair the quality-of-care patients receive?
PLEASE USE THE ATTACHED LINK TO COMPLETE THE ASSIGNMENT!!
Describing the Healthcare Issue and
its Importance
Surgical
site infections affect 2 to 5% of people following surgical operations (SSIs)
(Roy, 2021). These infections generate severe morbidity and death in patients,
as well as enormous financial burdens on healthcare systems. The number of surgical operations
performed in the United States continues to climb, and surgical patients are
progressively being treated with severe comorbidities. “It is believed that
nearly half of all SSIs are avoidable through the use of evidence-based strategies”
(Roy, 2021). This is a serious issue in the operating room since it causes more
harm to the patients, costs the hospital more money, and frequently
necessitates further procedures and treatments.
The
goal is to provide innovative and updated evidence-based strategies for SSI
prevention, and it should be implemented into overall surgical quality
improvement initiatives to improve patient safety. The issue of surgical site
infections in health care is thoroughly examined, as is the significance of
improving patient quality and safety. It is achievable to reduce the number of
infections in surgical patients by implementing evidence-based research on SSI
prevention in the operating room. Implementing evidence-based interventions
can help to reduce surgical site infections (SSI) and other healthcare concerns
that harm surgical patients in the operating room. “Surgical site infections
are persistent and preventable healthcare-associated infections” (American
Medical Association, 2018).
There is a growing demand for evidence-based interventions for SSI prevention. This
health-care problem is structured to supply new and updated evidence-based
strategies for why surgical site infections should be included in surgical
quality improvement programs to improve patient safety.
Target Population and
Effects of Issue or Problem
The target population for the intervention
of surgical site infections would be surgical patients. Surgical site
infections are infections that arise after surgery in the incision, organ, or
space (American Medical
Association, 2018).
While most antibiotics can be used to treat the majority of surgical site
infections. Additional surgery or treatments may be necessary to treat the SSI
in select cases. Surgical site infections can have an impact on patients,
causing them to have a longer hospital stay, causing more financial stress, and
drastically reducing their well-being. It is critical to creating a better
strategy for surgical site infection prevention since any type of surgical
patient is at risk. Surgical site infections have a large target population
since it does not discriminate based on age, gender, or ethnicity. Seeing
as SSIs have a significant impact on both patients and healthcare
organizations, efforts should be focused on developing varied collaborative
preventative strategies (Tartari, 2018). It is critical that this target
demographic understands the many preventative measures they may take before surgery, as well as what the surgical team can do to significantly reduce the
number of surgical site infections.
PICO Formatting and
Questions
– In surgical patients, is there
evidence to suggest that surgical site infections (SSI) in the operating room
compared to evidence-based preventions impair the quality-of-care patients
receive?

Is there evidence that surgical site infections
(SSI) in the operating room, as compared to evidence-based preventions, reduce
the quality and safety of treatment patients receive?

 

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